Guitars Made For Fast Playing

Discussion about guitar playing from a diverse group of people with different tastes and levels of experience.
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NoteBoat
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Post by NoteBoat » February 18th, 2005, 5:40 pm

Jumbo frets are higher (and a touch wider) than regular frets. Because they're high, when you reach the fret and keep pushing your finger down, you're stretching the string between the fret and the bridge - so the note goes sharp.

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Taso
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Post by Taso » February 18th, 2005, 8:10 pm

he says different things at different times. I think he just likes to hear himself being interviewed.

Lol. Good point... Agree with you 100%

Anyways, who cares what Malmsteen says? Or any other guitar "god". Clapton doesn't use his pinky when he does solos, just his 1st, 2nd, and 3rd fingers. Does that mean all of us aspiring blues guitarists shouldn't use our pinkies? Obviously not.

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Sly and the Family Stone
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Post by Sly and the Family Stone » February 18th, 2005, 11:15 pm

i personally dont like the scalloped neck, it feels too flimsy, and i play better with my meatier strat. in the end i think it merely comes down to feel and personal preference. also, i found that with the scalloped neck, i found myself having to regulate the pressure of my fretting, which slowed me down, as opposed to just fretting the note regardless of pressure.

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Re:

Post by Megadethhead » March 21st, 2018, 12:42 pm

NoteBoat wrote:
February 15th, 2005, 11:25 am
If all you're interested in is speed for lead playing, you'll want to look at scalloped necks.

It's the fret (not your finger) that produces a tone. Scalloped necks are designed so your fingers won't actually touch the fretboard - you're just touching the string enough to make the fret sound the note. Press too hard and you'll go sharp - because you'll be bending the string and raising the pitch - but if you spend the time getting used the light touch, there's no question you'll play faster.... your fingers will sort of 'dance' on the strings without wasting energy banging up against the fingerboard.

The downside is you'll never play rhythm guitar with one; things like barre chords will be virtually impossible to produce in tune when you have more than one finger pressing on a string.

So if you want to be a one-trick-pony like Yngwie (who uses a scalloped neck), try one out.
First of all, If you can play like Yngwie you can play anything, so no Yngwie is not a one trick pony because once you have technique that you can play anything. Second of all the best playing guitar is the one that you set up yourself.

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NoteBoat
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Re: Re:

Post by NoteBoat » March 31st, 2018, 3:20 pm

Megadethhead wrote:
March 21st, 2018, 12:42 pm
If you can play like Yngwie you can play anything
I strongly disagree.

Yngwie plays single note lines and nothing else. That's not being able to "play anything".

He does what he does very well, but that's all he does.
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Re: Guitars Made For Fast Playing

Post by alessiomarkz » April 20th, 2018, 1:21 am

Could those life taking plays are authentic in those guitar world ?

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Re: Guitars Made For Fast Playing

Post by localguitarist » May 29th, 2018, 3:13 pm

Don't really think that really matters when it comes to personalization and playing the guitar. People will have their preferences and so on

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Re: Guitars Made For Fast Playing

Post by unleashedfury » July 26th, 2018, 12:27 am

It really boils down to 2 things

Personal Preference

Skill of Player.

If I just started learning guitar and decide that cause Paul Gilbert plays this specific guitar that is what makes him play so fast. Then If I get that guitar I am going to play that fast too. No if it worked that way all guitars would be exactly the same because then Manufactures would have released the key to getting everyone's business

I have a slew of guitars when I switch from one to another there is a difference in my playing but only slightly. I have a C-Neck Shaped Jackson that while it gives me more control on my thumb when its pressed on the back of the neck, I have a hard time with using my thumb on chords where I am using it to hit a bass note with a chord
. I don't really find it comfortable to play rhythym passages with except for bar chords. If I try to spice up a passage by adding little notes or a walking bass line I have to take a few runs to get it right.

Naturally the quality of guitar will help with speed. if you are playing a guitar that has a excessively high action, or needs repair bowed or twisted neck, you can still play fast but it will sound terrible. a well setup 100 dollar guitar will play just as fast as the 5000 dollar guitar.

What you like is what you like, if your a Gibson fan, you probably play more gibsons than you do anything, your style of playing and technique works well on a Gibson, if I hand you a Strat your style of playing nor technique won't change. it might just sound a bit different.

If you have been around guitars long enough you can spout off a hundred gimmicks that were sold to "make guitar easier or play faster quickly"

Truth be told, there is only one method. practice, learn what you like get good at that. Repetition will build muscle memory and speed will come with more practice. Don't be afraid to try different guitars, but don't expect to have a guitar just make you an instantly faster player.

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Re: Guitars Made For Fast Playing

Post by matthewwensor21 » July 27th, 2018, 4:24 am

Yeah I would say Ibanez, Suhr, Jackson, ESP etc are all aimed at 'fast' shredding players.
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Re: Guitars Made For Fast Playing

Post by oldstrummer » August 8th, 2018, 6:47 am

I keep seeing the term "shredding" used and have never seen a good definition of it. What is shredding?

When I read this, I substitute the concept of "extremely fast, meaningless, souless" guitar playing. I've heard numerous "shredders" play, and while their technical prowess is undeniable, their musicianship doesn't do a thing for me.

I've heard Al di Meola play lightning fast solos - so clean and pure - that make the hair on the back of my neck stand up. Jeff Beck does things with his guitar that makes me (and many others) say, "How in the heck does he _do_ that???" Clapton, in his drugged-up younger days could make smoke rise from his fingerboard.

Are these guys "shredders?" And, once you've got the speed to shred, what's next? I can't see shredding on every piece you play. To me, that's B-O-R-I-N-G.
Duke Ellington said it best: "If it sounds good, it IS good!"

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