Welcome to the forums!

Loose Input Jack

Need to know how to setup your guitar? How do you lower your action? How do you get rid of the Milli Vanilli stickers? Look here first.

Moderator: The GN support team


Postby campgn » October 23rd, 2008, 3:56 am

Sorry, this is a newby question, but I would appreciate help.

I have a Mexi Strat it is several years old, but in excellant shape. The jack is loose and the nut is not tight to the 'housing'. If I wiggle the chord, the sound cuts in and out with static, which I assume is the result of the jack being loose. The chord plug seems to sit loosely in the jack as well.

Now, How do I fix this?

If I tighten things up, will the chord plug sit more tightly in the jack? To do this do I want the threaded tube to sit further IN the 'mount' or further OUt of it. To do this, I assume I screw in (or out) the threaded tube itself and Then tighten the nut. Is this correct? Is there another nut inside the that needs to be adjusted?

Are there any sites that might have pictures and explanations?

Finally, am I going down the wrong path and is there another possible issue (wear?).

As you can tell, I'm a real neophyte and afraid to touch it until I have some confidence of what I am doing.

Thanks for reading this and thanks for any advice.

camp
campgn
newbie
 
Posts: 3
Joined: October 23rd, 2008, 3:42 am

Postby gnease » October 23rd, 2008, 5:00 am

Do NOT rotate the "threaded tube." Doing that eventually will break the internal wire connections to the jack. If the only problem is a loose jack, then get a flat blade (standard) screwdriver whose flat tip can just barely be inserted into the jack, and do this to hold the threaded tube in place while tightening the nut. Do force the screwdrive in, just use the edges to grap the inside of the tube. Don't strongarm the nut to tighten it. Next check operation. If plug is now snug in the jack and the electrical connection is solid (no intermittent behavior), then use a drop of clear fingernail polish or Locktite thread lock (you will loosen and retighten to use this) to lock the nut in place. If you are experiencing either of the above problems, it is time to remove the two philips screws that hold in the Strat jack plate and have a look underneath for broken wires and and deformed jack contacts. Get help from an electro-mechanically inclined friend if you need it.
gnease
Musically Insane
 
Posts: 5523
Joined: March 2nd, 2004, 10:38 am

Postby campgn » October 23rd, 2008, 5:07 am

Tks for that advise.

GLAD I did not try anything without checking....

cheers

camp
campgn
newbie
 
Posts: 3
Joined: October 23rd, 2008, 3:42 am

Postby jeffster1 » October 23rd, 2008, 7:42 am

gnease wrote:Do NOT rotate the "threaded tube." Doing that eventually will break the internal wire connections to the jack. If the only problem is a loose jack, then get a flat blade (standard) screwdriver whose flat tip can just barely be inserted into the jack, and do this to hold the threaded tube in place while tightening the nut. Do force the screwdrive in, just use the edges to grap the inside of the tube. Don't strongarm the nut to tighten it. Next check operation. If plug is now snug in the jack and the electrical connection is solid (no intermittent behavior), then use a drop of clear fingernail polish or Locktite thread lock (you will loosen and retighten to use this) to lock the nut in place. If you are experiencing either of the above problems, it is time to remove the two philips screws that hold in the Strat jack plate and have a look underneath for broken wires and and deformed jack contacts. Get help from an electro-mechanically inclined friend if you need it.


This should be a sticky somewhere. I did this to my old guitar (it's a pretty easy soldering fix usually), and almost every other player I know has done this at some point. That's also a good tip about the screwdriver to hold the socket. I usually just lightly turned it until even the slightest bit of resistance then stopped, but your idea is much better.
User avatar
jeffster1
Full Member
 
Posts: 231
Joined: June 27th, 2007, 5:13 pm

Postby dhodge » October 23rd, 2008, 8:01 am

jeffster1 wrote:This should be a sticky somewhere.


Wish granted.

Peace
User avatar
dhodge
Musically Insane
 
Posts: 5559
Joined: June 15th, 2002, 8:21 am

Postby Ricochet » October 23rd, 2008, 9:03 am

I'd further advise applying a bit of blue Loctite to the threads before tightening.

The loosening of the jack occurs from the cable hanging from the jack and swinging as you move around. To prevent this, never leave the cable hanging free from the jack. Run the cable between the guitar body and strap from behind, then turn it around to plug it in. The strap will catch and hold the cable, preventing it from tugging on the jack and loosening it. And you're less likely to accidentally unplug yourself as well.
"A cheerful heart is good medicine."
User avatar
Ricochet
Guitari Lama
 
Posts: 8056
Joined: July 20th, 2003, 4:48 pm
Location: Bristol, Tennessee, USA

Postby TRGuitar » October 24th, 2008, 8:19 am

Since it's a "stickey"

You can get blue "Lock Tite" or it's equivalent at most auto parts stores. You want the blue not the red as the blue is designed to be taken apart and the red is permanent.

Image



I took the liberty to add an illistration of Greg's screw driver technique .......

Image





and the technique Ric mentioned for looping the strap. I have been doing this for 30 years and no lose jacks!

Image
"Work hard, rock hard, eat hard, sleep hard,
grow big, wear glasses if you need 'em."
-- The Webb Wilder Credo --
User avatar
TRGuitar
Guitarnoise Addict
 
Posts: 3708
Joined: January 2nd, 2007, 10:31 pm
Location: Northern New York

Postby campgn » October 24th, 2008, 8:34 am

TKS for all the help!

My only issue now is that I don't have a wrench that will fit between the nut and the plate. I have a strat with one of those odd angle jacks. Is a special tool required?

I was able to tighten a bit with a 12 mil (i think) wrench, but not enough to my liking.

cheers
campgn
newbie
 
Posts: 3
Joined: October 23rd, 2008, 3:42 am

Postby gnease » October 24th, 2008, 10:53 am

If you remove the Strat jack plate from the guitar (two screws), there is probably a second, inside nut on the other side of the plate. And that inside nut might be easier to access with a skinny wrench or -- and I cringe to suggest it -- needlenose pliers. Pliers are really a last resort as they easily damage nuts and/or cause collateral damage when they inevitably slip off the nut. If there is not an inside nut, it is easy to add one. Buy a $3 jack from RadioShack and "borrow" one of the nuts from that. There is usually more than enough length on the threaded sections of the jack to accommodate two nuts on a Strat plate.

If you do remove the plate and have a look inside, you also will gain a better understanding of the problem and these suggested solutions.
gnease
Musically Insane
 
Posts: 5523
Joined: March 2nd, 2004, 10:38 am

Postby blackegobox » November 15th, 2008, 8:23 am

I had the same problem as campgn, but one day the sound went out altogether....
so i removed the jack plate to see, but it's not like i now anything about wires and whatnot.... so i took a photo but i doubt you can see something, but anyway.... does something look wrong in there? if anyone already had the same problem, what is there to fix?
i can try to take a better picture, or a different angle, if someone thinks he or she can help. and my guitar is a Jackson.
thanks for taking the time to read this.

here's the photo:
http://www.esnips.com/doc/6b96f947-3cfd-4598-adb7-489ab90198bf/jack-plate
blackegobox
newbie
 
Posts: 9
Joined: November 14th, 2008, 5:31 am
Location: France

Postby Ricochet » November 15th, 2008, 8:29 am

Looks like a bunch of nasty corrosion in there. (The white powder.) Have you tried spraying it with an electronics cleaner, like Deoxit? Also, have you tried another cable? Cables break inside and quit working far more often than jacks do.
"A cheerful heart is good medicine."
User avatar
Ricochet
Guitari Lama
 
Posts: 8056
Joined: July 20th, 2003, 4:48 pm
Location: Bristol, Tennessee, USA

Postby blackegobox » November 17th, 2008, 4:10 am

thank you for the tip about cables, i'll remember that!
and, that area has never been cleaned :oops: so i'll try to get my hands on some electronics cleaner, and i'll see.
thank you for the answer!
blackegobox
newbie
 
Posts: 9
Joined: November 14th, 2008, 5:31 am
Location: France

Postby Hyperborea » November 17th, 2008, 7:29 am

Ricochet wrote:Also, have you tried another cable? Cables break inside and quit working far more often than jacks do.


Mostly at the end too cause that's where most of the sharp bending happens. If it is at the end what the OP can do is just cut off the last 3" to 6" and then re-solder on the plug. It won't work forever as sooner or later there'll be break in the middle of the cable or maybe you'll run out of cable to snip off.
Pop music is about stealing pocket money from children. - Ian Anderson
Hyperborea
Senior Member
 
Posts: 832
Joined: January 29th, 2007, 4:11 pm
Location: Silicon Valley

Postby Ricochet » November 17th, 2008, 9:56 am

That's why I have a bunch of dead cables lying around with a loose knot tied in them for recognition. One of these days I hope to get around to fixing them.
"A cheerful heart is good medicine."
User avatar
Ricochet
Guitari Lama
 
Posts: 8056
Joined: July 20th, 2003, 4:48 pm
Location: Bristol, Tennessee, USA

Postby smokindog » February 28th, 2009, 4:58 pm

I just got my Epiphone 333 back from the shop. $55 :shock: The jack wires twisted off and you have to pretty much take off the pickups and most of the electronics to get to it since there is no access plate :roll: At least he put on new strings and tweaked the intonation :D
User avatar
smokindog
Musically Insane
 
Posts: 5363
Joined: September 27th, 2004, 7:55 pm
Location: Powdersville S.C.

Next